News

Toys R Us to hire 45K workers for Black Friday

Toys R Us to hire 45K workers for Black Friday

Toys R Us plans to hire 45,000 workers nationwide. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Toys R Us plans to hire 45,000 seasonal workers at its stores and distribution centers, the same number as last year, as it ramps up for the all-important holiday season.

Coming off a slower-than-expected back-to-school season, analysts and stores are bracing for a tough holiday shopping period, which accounts for as much as 40 percent of stores’ annual revenue.

Stores typically begin to hire for the holidays in mid-September and ramp up hiring in mid-October.

Overall holiday hiring is expected to be relatively flat because of cautious consumer spending and uncertainty about the economic environment. Employer consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc. estimates that overall seasonal hiring will not change significantly from last year’s total, when hiring rose 14 percent to 751,800 positions between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31.

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