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Today is the 60th anniversary of Elvis’ first recording

Today is the 60th anniversary of Elvis’ first recording

THE KING: Sixty years ago today, the career of the man who would be known as the King of Rock and Roll began. Photo: Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A variety of special events will celebrate the 60th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s first rock-and-roll recording in Memphis.

On July 5, 1954, a 19-year-old Presley walked into Sun Studio in Memphis and recorded a version of “That’s All Right.” Days later, the song was played repeatedly on WHBQ radio, and the career of the man known as the King of Rock and Roll was born.

Sun Studio will hold an event on July 5 that will include a cake-cutting and an exhibit tied to the recording’s anniversary.

PHOTOS: Elvis Presley through the years | EXTRA: Elvis Presley pathway to be built in Memphis

Musicians will play Presley songs at a concert at the Levitt Shell, the site of his first professional performance.

Visitors to Graceland, Presley’s longtime home, can see an exhibit showcasing Presley’s impact on music and popular culture.

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