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Rock Hall says Jimi Hendrix at Monterey ‘greatest’ festival moment

Rock Hall says Jimi Hendrix at Monterey ‘greatest’ festival moment

JIMI HENDRIX:Rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix performing with The Jimi Hendrix Experience at the Monterey Pop Festival, California, June 18, 1967. Photo: Associated Press/Bruce Fleming

CLEVELAND (AP) — What’s the greatest performance at a music festival? According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, it’s Jimi Hendrix at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, when he set his guitar on fire.

The Rock Hall asked fans to vote on their favorite moments and that one topped the list.

Big Brother and the Holding Company’s set at that same festival is number two.

Queen’s set at Live Aid in 1985 comes in third. Santana at Woodstock is number four.

The moment when Bob Dylan “went electric” at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival was number five.

Otis Redding at Monterey was number six, Nine Inch Nails at Woodstock ’94 was seventh, and Sly and the Family Stone at the original Woodstock was number eight.

U2 at Live Aid was number nine, and Muddy Waters at the 1960 Newport Jazz Festival was 10th.

The Rock Hall museum will open an exhibit on music festivals tomorrow.

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