News

Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

PATERNITY LEAVE:New York Mets Daniel Murphy (28) at bat in the ninth inning of the baseball game against the Atlanta Braves Wednesday, April 9, in Atlanta. The Braves won the game 4-3. Photo: Associated Press/Todd Kirkland

JON KRAWCZYNSKI, AP Sports Writer

When New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy was criticized on talk radio for spending three days with his family after the birth of his son, teammates, coaches and opponents leapt to his defense.

The four major pro sports leagues in North America are becoming increasingly open to paternity leave as more players express a desire to be with their families when a baby arrives.

Major League Baseball is the only league with a standardized policy written into its rulebook. But the NFL, NBA and NHL have all shown willingness to give their players some time when that day comes.

Players say that kind of compassion is a welcome change from decades ago, when athletes often missed one of life’s biggest moments to stay with their teams.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

The best April Fools’ Day pranks by companies

Fresh
pacmanmaps

Google Panda, the Samsung smart knife, and more: Because even corporate America likes to pull one over on us.

in Music, Entertainment

Rihanna isn’t dating Leonardo DiCaprio … she swears

Fresh
rihanna

The "Diamonds" hitmaker and the actor have been spotted at several events together, but she swears she's "too busy" to date.

in Sports, Viral Videos

WATCH: Puppies predict the Final Four

Fresh
16-overlay

It's a totally unscientific, but completely adorable, way to predict the winner of the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship.

in Entertainment

Mark Wahlberg plans movie about Boston Marathon bombing

Fresh
bostonbomber

The Massachusetts-born actor is set to produce a movie based on the horrific 2013 attacks.

in National

The latest developments on ‘religious-objection’ laws

Fresh
arkansasreligiousobjections

Indiana's new religious-objections law has sparked fears that it could allow discrimination.