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Nicki Minaj blasts ‘ESPN magazine’ for ‘growing’ her forehead

Nicki Minaj blasts ‘ESPN magazine’ for ‘growing’ her forehead

BLASTED: Nicki Minaj says her forehead is not as big as Photoshop would have you believe. Photo: Associated Press/Brad Barket

Nicki Minaj has accused editors at ESPN magazine of ruining her cover shoot for the publication by retouching her image.

The “Super Bass” hitmaker graces the cover of the sports publication’s February issue, along with basketball star Kobe Bryant, but the rapper is convinced the shots are not true to life.

Minaj took to Instagram.com on Thursday to post a photo of the cover and wrote, “When retouching goes wrong.”

She posted additional pre-edited shots, including one of the photos with a caption that reads: “I love my personal unretouched photos where my forehead doesn’t mysteriously grow in length.”

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