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Netflix to debut original Spanish-language series

Netflix to debut original Spanish-language series

NETFLIX:Netflix said the series, a 13-episode comedy about a family feud among the heirs to a soccer club, is slated to premiere in 2015 and will be shot in Mexico. Photo: Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Netflix Inc on Wednesday announced its first original Spanish-language television series, a bid by the video-streaming company to attract subscribers in Latin America and Spanish speakers in the United States

Netflix said the series, a 13-episode comedy about a family feud among the heirs to a soccer club, is slated to premiere in 2015 and will be shot in Mexico.

The series, which is so far untitled, will be produced by Gaz Alazraki, the director of the popular 2013 Mexican comedy film “Nosotros los Nobles” (“We Are the Nobles”), and star Mexican actor Luis Gerardo Mendez.

Netflix’s venture into original programming, which includes political thriller “House of Cards” and comedy-drama “Orange Is the New Black,” has earned the first Emmy Awards for an online-only company.

“House of Cards,” which stars Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, earned three Emmys last year.

Netflix is available in much of Latin America.

(Reporting by Eric Kelsey; Editing by Mary Milliken and Leslie Adler)

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