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Katharine Hepburn biopic coming to big screen

Katharine Hepburn biopic coming to big screen

BIOPIC: Actor Spencer Tracy is shown posing with longtime companion and co-star Katharine Hepburn during their heyday. Photo: Associated Press

Hollywood legend Katharine Hepburn is set to get the big screen treatment yet again in an upcoming biopic.

Independent film producers are developing a new film about the iconic actress based on author William J. Mann’s book, “Kate: The Woman Who Was Hepburn.”

British director Clare Beavan has been tapped to helm the film, while the screenwriting team of Michael Zam and Jaffe Cohen, who wrote “Best Actress” about Joan Crawford and Bette Davis’ rivalry, are set to adapt the book for film.

“Kate: The Woman Who Was Hepburn” will focus on her early years in movies and how she went from an outsider to becoming one of the most beloved stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age.

Earlier this year, bosses at Reunion Pictures announced they are also in the process of developing a film centered around Hepburn and her 25-year love affair with Spencer Tracy.

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