Former Husky WR Stringfellow heading to Nebraska

Former Husky WR Stringfellow heading to Nebraska

File - Washington's Damore'ea Stringfellow, left, tries to shake off the tackle attempt from BYU defensive back Michael Davis during first half of the Fight Hunger Bowl NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, in San Francisco. Photo: Associated Press/AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez’s Mitch Sherman is reporting that former Washington Huskies wide receiver Damore’ea Stringfellow is transferring to the University of Nebraska.

According to, Stringfellow signed the necessary paperwork on Saturday.

Stringfellow recorded 20 receptions as a true freshman for the Huskies last season, finishing with 259 yards and one touchdown.

However, an altercation with two Seattle Seahawk fans in February with Washington quarterback Cyler Miles caused both players to be suspended by new Husky head coach Chris Petersen. Stringfellow later plead guilty to charges stemming from the incident.

Due to NCAA transfer rules, Stringfellow must sit out in 2014. He will be a third-year sophomore in 2015.

(KPUG Newsroom – Tysen Allumbaugh)


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