AP Source: Tigers & Cabrera agree to $292 million over 10 years

AP Source: Tigers  & Cabrera agree to $292 million over 10 years

Detroit Tigers' Miguel Cabrera Photo: Associated Press/AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

DETROIT (AP) — A person with knowledge of the deal says the Detroit Tigers have agreed to pay Miguel Cabrera a baseball record $292 million over the next 10 years.

The person, who says the contract is subject to a physical, spoke Thursday night to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the agreement had not been announced.

Cabrera is due $44 million over the final two years from his $152.3 million, eight-year contract, and the person says Cabrera will make $248 million over eight seasons in the new deal that begins in 2016.

Cabrera has been voted AL MVP in each of the last two seasons. He won the Triple Crown in 2012, becoming baseball’s first player to lead either league in batting average, homers and RBIs since 1967.


AP Sports Writer Ronald Blum in New York contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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